On Monday 6th March the WING met to taste Pinot Noir from Australia and New Zealand. Led by Anna and Paul we tried two wines from Otago NZ, two from Mornington Peninsula, a Tasmanian and one from the Adelaide Hills. In practice these were three flights at different price points: £18-£20; £26-£29 and £35-£40. All the wines were sourced from Great Western Wines.

The evening proved pleasurable, illuminating and a little bit surprising. Here are my notes:

YEALANDS ESTATE WINEMAKER’S RESERVE GIBBSTONE VALLEY 2014 (Otago)
Very purple, mainly strong cherry fruit nose with hard-ish hints of spice and herb. Palate is rather sweet with cherry and plummy fruit, some oak and a salty, slightly bitter, minerality and a warm finish. Dense and enjoyable, but with jammy fruit and mineral acid not fully integrated and a bit simple.

KOOYONG MASSALE 2013 (Mornington)
Nose has a pungent start, similar components to the previous wine, but more restrained, integrated and interesting. Raspberry fruit with an acid line and vegetal hints, drier and better integrated with an elegant finish. Good and good value.

Paul surveys the remains of an intriguing tasting!

CARRICK BANNOCKBURN ESTATE 2013 (Otago)
Farmyard pungency and loganberry fruit nose. Palate is more complicated with a dry structure, grainy tannins and a savoury mineral acid frame, with, slightly simple but contained loganberry fruit. Quite enjoyable and more what I might expect from NZ.

HENSCHKE GILES 2012 (Adelaide Hills)
This has a classic Pinot Noir pale colour and strawberry nose, ethereal floral notes too. Palate is velvety, with spicy warmth throughout and an integrated fruit/acid line and a rounded finish. Very satisfying and enjoyable, I think – although it’s hard to decide – my favourite!

Finally the most expensive flight:

STARGAZER 2014 (Huon Valley, Tasmania)
Initial farmyard, almost acrid, pungency and a then slight minty (though not as sharp as actual mint) inflection, as well as spice and heavier floral hints.  Palate has drier red fruit with balancing acidity, some grainy tannin and hints of spice. Lots going on but perhaps needs a year or two to integrate.

KOOYONG HAVEN 2012 (Mornington)
Initial pungency again and then quite a quiet nose with a crème brûlée hint and dark raspberry. Palate has a saline lead-in and then a big, grainy, herb and spice accented middle, reminiscent of bitter chocolate infused with black raspberry liqueur. Impressive, pleasurable and full but at this (£40) price I think I could track down a Burgundy with more complexity and finesse..

An amazingly interesting tasting which confounded my expectation that the NZ wines would show somehow “cooler” than the Australians. In fact the opposite was the case and even the final, bigger wines showed balance and tension. In fact the “coolest” wine – least alcohol and lightest on its feet – was the Henschke. All the wines were enjoyable and showed quite some variety, a lovely evening…

Thanks so much Paul and Anna

Finally, I note with a surprise that this is the 200th post on this blog. A realization that sneaked up on me only when I made the 199th post a week ago… So I haven’t had much time to concoct a cunning and intricate puzzle for readers as I did when reaching the 100 milestone (it seems) not so long ago.

Apologies for that, however here is a vineyard photograph. If any member can tell me exactly what  Denominación/ Denominação/ Lage/ Denominazione/ Appellation those vines come under the can win a bottle of the wine in question…

Where is this?

Only one guess per person via the comments section to the Members’ page, before 28th March!

Until next time…

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